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Sunday, April 8, 2018

California Dreaming?



Friends, you may not know it, but I'm a California native.  It's nothing to be proud of these days, but once upon a time California was a red state.  It was the state that gave us Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan.  It was a state with affordable housing, reasonable gun laws, low crime, excellent schools, and low taxes.  Well, times have changed.  Since 1992 California has voted blue in every single Presidential election.  Moreover, the stories of leftist lunacy that come out of the Golden State have become a staple of the news cycle.  Right now many California communities are in revolt because of the state's radical "sanctuary city" laws, which make virtually any cooperation with federal immigration authorities a criminal offense.  While it's tempting to give up on the California Republican Party altogether, Newt Gingrich makes a compelling argument for why we shouldn't.  While I'm not optimistic that we'll win the governorship, let's not give up on the large minority of Californians who remain, well, sane...  Some of these embattled patriots are my relatives, after all!

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/04/07/newt-gingrich-california-may-elect-republican-governor-incredible-as-that-sounds.html

In other news, this New York Times analysis of the impending "trade war" with China is pretty perceptive.  Truthfully, the proposed sanctions, even if fully implemented, would barely dent the economies of either China or the U.S.  China is playing a dangerous game, in my opinion, trying to blackmail red state Americans into betraying their President and his nationalistic trade policies.  Let's hold together, America, and fight on to victory!  I fear Trump won't get as much support as he should from either party, but if you're tired of the Chinese pushing us around, then please stand with President Trump!

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/05/world/asia/china-trade-war-trump-tariffs.html

9 comments:

  1. Dr. Waddy: I was homeported in San Diego from 68-72 and I didn't like it. I know its a town where many retired military live and for good reasons but active duty guys were treated pretty disdainfully at least downtown. It had an effect on my overall opinion of California. But my brother moved to San Diego in the '70's and has taught me much about the area. He calls it "Iowa on the Pacific". I understand the central agricultural region of the state to be quite conservative and in my experience there, I believe much of northern CA to be so too. Obviously though, there must a very heavily populated lala leftist region(s) which can outvote the real Americans in that tortured state. I thought that California was lost for good but if as perceptive an observer as Gingrich thinks otherwise (my computer would not "allow" me to access his article)maybe there is hope for the common sense people there. I think the President is very serious about sealing the border with the military and if CA continues to radicalize and to act like an independent nation, I could see our forces actually being placed on the California border - for two reasons: to stop illegals from passing into the law abiding majority of states and to isolate CA and warn it that it risks the use of federal force against it. That US citizens should be liable for state criminal charges for obeying federal law is insupportable. But for the myriad real Americans there I would be glad to see that state go off on its own to guaranteed Marxist dysfunction and eventual repatriation. We'd be better off without it. China: Having some knowledge of Chinese history and some scanty experience of daily Chinese life during my semester in Singapore and Malaysia I continue to be elated by China's ever increasing prosperity. They are the hardest workers and the best entrepreneurs in the world I think. I continue to believe that their fundamental national goal is the certain security of China but if, in this new world, that in their view necessitates economic confrontation with the U.S., then we can and must meet them. It could be a competition which benefits both nations.

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  2. Jack -- I agree that healthy competition between the US and China could be beneficial. I certainly enjoy many of the Chinese-made products that I buy. It would be nice if we tried "free trade" for real, i.e. if they gave us genuine and unfettered access to their market, as we do for them. I hope that's the final outcome. A complex "deal" dividing the spoils would be less to my liking.

    California has changed enormously since I was born there. Demographically, economically, and especially politically, it's more or less a different place. San Diego used to be very conservative, but it's gone blue in the last three elections and I would guess will never go red again. Very sad.

    I continue to believe that the best response to the sanctuary city movement is charges against the worst offending politicians. Even a court victory against California's law wouldn't really matter -- California would just pass a new law. We need to take the gloves off, if real progress is to be made.

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  3. Dr. Waddy: There is an implied comic historical aspect to the China-America economic relationship: In the later 18th century George III offered the Chien Lung Emperor economic intercourse. Chien Lung thanked him but noted that Britain had little that China needed or wanted. I have to wonder if there is much we can offer which China itself cannot supply to the satisfaction of its, yes, ever more prosperous and discriminating populace. Food, perhaps. But even if we had unfettered access to their market I would guess the "balance of trade" would still redound to their advantage. I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. I do back President Trump in his effort to seek a fair trade relationship with China; it may well alleviate many factors set against us. In the end though, we must outproduce China (both in quantity and ultimately in quality - remember how Japanese goods were once excoriated?)in order to establish a statistical.advantage. I seriously doubt that we can. I believe I agree with you on CA; federal criminal charges against culpable CA officials must be pursued before military action can be enacted.

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  4. I don't necessarily disagree, Jack -- the elimination of our trade deficit may be a pipe dream. And yet I do believe that it ought to be drastically reduced. For one thing, the best thing we have going for us is our intellectual/cultural products. Hollywood and other forms of American mass culture dominate the world. Surely if our copyrights were respected we would make a killing... Can China supply its own wants? Sure, but so can we. Plus, I suspect increasingly other "developing" countries will overtake China when it comes to exporting goods manufactured with unskilled labor. Chinese wages are by no means the world's lowest anymore. In time, some semblance of balance will be restored -- I would just like to see it happen sooner rather than later.

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  5. Dr. Waddy: I would too; there are many potential areas of possible conflict with China and I'd like to see as many as possible eliminated as long as in doing so we do not shame ourselves. I want very much to see us get along with that great civilization. Good point about other "developing" nations taking over China's role in supplying the products of unskilled labor. As their prosperity grows (and I know some observers think they are headed for a crash but I'd guess the days of utter destitution are gone; Japan had one and they are still first world) they will have a much smaller unskilled workforce.It may even be for them that, with so much material well being,the presence of such a force may be a source of social unrest. With increasing wealth may come an ever broadening segment of educated people for whom regard for intellectual integrity places copyright in a much respected light. Perhaps they will object to piracy of, at least, learned works.

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  6. Unfortunately, I think in some ways intellectual property rights are doomed, in a world where books, movies, video, music, etc. can be shared at the click of a button. My guess is China will increasingly play by the rules, though, because respectability will suit them as they grow more prosperous and developed. Now, whether China will hit an economic wall someday -- I'm not sure. If it does, the world could become a scary place.

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  7. My husband was stationed in San Diego some 30 years ago, sadly, it has changed since then. Loved visiting Escondido. I can remember vividly seeing the USS Kitty Hawk sailing under that bridge in 1987, amazing.

    Since I agree with you and Jack, I'll keep my comment at a minimum. smiles

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  8. Hi Linda! San Diego is still a great town, but every year it gets a little bluer (politically and psychologically)... Ah, to return to the good old days.

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  9. Dr. Waddy and Linda: I do not at all resent disagreement or criticism of my views. That was just my experience in SD. I spent four years on the Kitty Hawk's sister ship, Constellation.

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